Come rain, hail or shine, Australians have an international reputation for loving the outdoors.


 

Our summers are the envy of those abroad and we embrace the heat every summer, swarming to the beach by the masses and relishing in the 30-degree heat. But did you know that the number of diagnosed cases of skin cancer in Australia is triple the figures from Canada, the United States and the United Kingdom?

 

 

The idea of sun safety isn’t unfamiliar to Australians and Slip, Slop, Slap is a familiar slogan in most Aussie households. But just how far does our willingness to be sun-smart go?

 

It’s not often you see sunscreen-lathered beachgoers wearing long-sleeve rashies, wide-brimmed hats and sunglasses. This is largely due to style and fashion topping safety on our priority list. That’s all about to change though, thanks to Sunbella and their mission to encourage Aussie women to get proactive about sun care. 


‘Sun protection needs to be at the forefront of our minds,’ says Sunbella Co-Founder Casey Bryden. ‘Our vision is to blur the lines between safety and style.’


Sunbella is here to shake things up and redefine sun-smart fashion with a range of minimalist, sleek and stylish parasols so you never again have to compromise on sun protection for fear of looking unfashionable.


The modern sun umbrella, the Sunbella parasol is UV protector slash fashion accessory, which can block over 90 per cent of UV rays. This innovative concept offers consumers the opportunity to look stylish while breaking the stigma against parasols. It’s never been easier or more trendy to protect your skin from early signs of ageing, wrinkles and some skin cancers.


‘We wholeheartedly recognise that regardless of how stylish it is, carrying a sun umbrella requires a mind shift,’ says Casey. 


What is your reaction when you see the common rain umbrella being used during summertime? Do you applaud that persons’ diligence toward sun-safety or think they stand out like a sore thumb? 


Perhaps it’s a lack of education about how dangerous sun exposure can be, which has resulted in our Nation putting health second to our sense of style.


Alarmingly, two in three Australians will be diagnosed with skin cancer by age 70. 


This is just one of many frightening statistics about skin cancer in Australia but not the most concerning for Casey. 

‘What’s scarier to me is the widespread misunderstanding that skin cancers can simply be cut out.’

Cancer Council Australia says that 95 per cent of melanomas – the most dangerous type of skin cancer – are caused by sunburn. Research has shown that on an average weekend in summer, almost a quarter of the teenage population in Australia develop sunburn alongside 8 per cent of children and 14 per cent of adults.


Taking preventative measures to protect your skin from harmful UV rays should be a top priority for every Australian, a shift that Sunbella is determined to instigate.


Sunbella parasols have the highest possible Ultra Violet Protection Factor of 50+, offer more protection than a hat, are lightweight, wind-resistant and come in a range of breezy summer colours. 


Working as a Clinical Theatre Nurse, Casey’s Mum and Sunbella Co-Founder Jillian Intini saw firsthand, the number of women being treated for skin cancer and heard their frustrations at the lack of fashionable sun protection products. 

This was the springboard that set Sunbella in motion and Jillian and Casey have since been working to make skin care a priority for the women and men of Australia.


‘We’re on the cusp of the paradigm shift we’ve been pushing for.’ 


By offering a product that falls into the fashion and safety categories, the Sunbella vision is to ‘break down the barrier in peoples’ minds that sun safety has to be detrimental to your look.’


Not just for the ladies, an exciting Sunbella range for men is on the horizon. We heard whispers that it might even have ‘a gadget or two built-in!’


After winning the 2015 Business Excellence AusMumpreneur Award, Sunbella has been able to branch further into the mainstream market. A feat, which Casey says was challenging for a company that’s intent on breaking the mould.

‘By liberating women from the existing daggy connotations that sun protection has, hopefully we can help women make sun care a priority.’ 


Parasols have been around since the 19th century and although we’ve since moved away from corsets and flapper dresses; the parasol is definitely not just a relic of the past. 


Modern and styled for the 21st century woman, Sunbella’s Coast and City range of parasols give you the best of both worlds so you can enjoy the Aussie summer while ‘looking and feeling good at the same time.’

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The modern sun umbrella, the Sunbella parasol is UV protector / fashion accessory, which can block over 98 per cent of UV rays. This innovative concept offers consumers the opportunity to look stylish while breaking the stigma against parasols. 


Sunbella parasols boast the highest possible Ultra Violet Protection Factor of 50+, offer more protection than a hat, are lightweight, wind-resistant and come in a range of summer colours, providing the easiest and most sophisticated way to protect your skin from early signs of ageing, wrinkles and some skin cancers. ‘We wholeheartedly recognise that regardless of how stylish it is, carrying a sun umbrella requires a mind shift,’ says Casey. 


So what is your reaction when you see the common rain umbrella being used during summertime? Do you applaud that persons’ diligence toward sun-safety or think they stand out like a sore thumb? Perhaps it’s a lack of education about how dangerous sun exposure can be, which has resulted in our Nation putting health second to our sense of style.

Alarmingly, two in three Australians will be diagnosed with skin cancer by age 70. This is just one of many frightening statistics about skin cancer in Australia but not the most concerning for Casey. ‘What’s scarier to me is the widespread misunderstanding that skin cancers can simply be cut out,’ says Casey. 


Cancer Council Australia says that 95 per cent of melanomas – the most dangerous type of skin cancer – are caused by sunburn. Research has shown that on an average weekend in summer, almost a quarter of the teenage population in Australia develop sunburn alongside 8 per cent of children and 14 per cent of adults.Taking preventative measures to protect your skin from harmful UV rays should be a top priority for every Australian, a shift that Sunbella is determined to instigate.


Working as a Clinical Theatre Nurse, Casey’s Mum and Sunbella Co-Founder Jillian Intini saw firsthand, the number of women being treated for skin cancer and heard their frustrations at the lack of fashionable sun protection products. This was the springboard that set Sunbella in motion and Jillian and Casey have since been working to make skin care a priority for the women and men of Australia.


‘We’re on the cusp of the paradigm shift we’ve been pushing for.’ By offering a product that falls into the fashion and safety categories, the Sunbella vision is to ‘break down the barrier in peoples’ minds that sun safety has to be detrimental to your look.’


Parasols have been around since the 19th century and although we’ve since moved away from corsets and flapper dresses, the parasol is definitely not just a relic of the past! Modern and styled for the 21st century woman, Sunbella’s Coast and City range of parasols provide the best of both worlds, so users can enjoy the Aussie summer while ‘looking and feeling good at the same time’. And not just for the ladies, an exciting Sunbella range for men is on the horizon. In fact, we’ve heard whispers that it might even include ‘a built-in gadget or two!’


After winning the 2015 Business Excellence AusMumpreneur Award, Sunbella has been able to branch further into the mainstream market. A feat, which Casey says was challenging for a company that’s intent on breaking the mould. Add to this some incredible exposure from a high profile royal (see below) and this little Aussie start-up is well on its way to becoming a global phenomenon. 


‘By liberating women from the existing daggy connotations that sun protection has,’ explains Casey, ‘hopefully we can help ensure Australians start to make suncare a priority.’ 


Article by Juliana Mare